Northern Nevada Central Labor Council

 

Take Action

On July 22, the AFL-CIO is leading a national call-in day to demand that the Senate take up the HEROES Act.

America faces a crisis on three critical fronts: a public health pandemic, an economic free fall and long-standing structural racism. Working people need safe jobs, economic security and freedom from systemic racism. Delivering on economic essentials included in the HEROES Act is an absolute minimum requirement for stopping the free fall into even deeper and deadly racial inequality.

Take action to encourage the Senate to pass the #HEROESAct now! #PassTheHeroesAct

America faces crises on three critical fronts: a public health pandemic, an economic free fall and long-standing structural racism.  As America’s labor movement, we must urgently address all three with precision and purpose. They cannot be fixed separately.

America’s Five Economic Essentials must be combined with substantial policing reforms and implemented in ways that recognize the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on workers of color. This comprehensive agenda for the three crises addresses all working people’s needs for safe jobs, economic security and freedom from systemic racism. Drive by Believe Plaza in downtown Reno on June 17 at 9:30AM to demand America's 5 Economic Essentials for Racial and Economic Justice and honk to show your support.

5 Economic Essentials 1/5

We must also demand that Congress pass the HEROES Act and other racial and economic justice legislation. Click the button below to sign your support of the HEROES Act - and call your Senator to demand their support!

Recent News

This is a challenging time for working families across the country. We stand with you in the struggle as many of our businesses close or suspend activity. Here are some community resources that may be of help.

In May, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the HEROES Act, a piece of legislation that would provide much-needed solutions to our current economic and public safety crisis. Unfortunately, its path forward has been uncertain. There has been no debate on the bill in the Senate, and Mitch McConnell even sent the Senate on vacation without hearing it.

More than three years after taking office, the administration has never filled the job running the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which is charged with enforcing workplace safety laws. The $560 million-a-year agency, whose estimated 2,000 inspectors performed 32,020 on-site inspections in 2018, spent months not doing any in-person inspections related to coronavirus, other than in hospitals, said Rebecca Reindel, director of occupational safety and health for the AFL-CIO.