News

Dear Brothers and Sisters, Please read this update from AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka on the NLRB's reversal of its decision to halt union elections. Some good news amidst these challenging times.

Much of the American workplace has shut down, sending millions of employees home to wait out the coronavirus pandemic.

In a Medium post published today, U.S. Senator Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.) unveiled a comprehensive Disaster Resource Guide for Nevadans impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Brothers and Sisters,

Following the National, State and Local protection guidelines for the COVID-19 outbreak has impacted our lives.
Our members are hungry for reliable information regarding local businesses that are partially or fully operational during this period of closures.

Here is a list of such local businesses.  The link is updated regularly.

North Carolina workers need a raise. For 11 consecutive years, the cost of living (food, rent, education, childcare) has increased causing our minimum wage to decline in value by 24 percent. Now, a person working full-time while making $7.25 an hour lives thousands of dollars below the federal poverty threshold.

President Trump released a $4.8 trillion budget proposal on Monday that includes a familiar list of deep cuts to student loan assistance, affordable housing efforts, food stamps and Medicaid, reflecting Mr. Trump’s election-year effort to continue shrinking the federal safety net. The proposal, which is unlikely to be approved in its entirety by Congress, includes additional spending for the military, national defense and border enforcement, along with money for veterans, Mr.

Union leaders and labor rights advocates applauded the Democrat-controlled U.S. House for passing landmark legislation Thursday night that supporters have called one of the most notable efforts to expand workers' rights in several decades. "Make no mistake, this is the most significant step Congress has taken to strengthen labor laws in the United States in 85 years and a win for workers everywhere," said AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka, declaring the measure "the labor movement's number one legislative priority this year."

Support for the labor movement is the highest in nearly half a century, yet only one in 10 workers are members of unions today. How can both be true?

A recent Gallup poll found that 64% of Americans approve of unions and research from MIT shows nearly half of non-union workers—more than 60 million people—would vote to join today if given the opportunity. Twenty-five years ago, only one-third of workers said the same thing.